What’s Happening: August 14, 2013


  • Are you ready???
    For the best news in THE WORLD??????
    Passion had her monthly ve…

    Are you ready???
    For the best news in THE WORLD??????
    Passion had her monthly vet check today with Danny Holmes.
    He also took blood to check for everything known to man.
    And guess what????
    They all came back perfect for the first time since she was rescued!!!!!!!!!!
    As of now, we have a perfect horse that just needs to put on weight. She does still suffer from a kidney infection every few weeks but that's to be expected and a seven day course of meds and apple cider will fix that.
    Can I be more happy tonight?
    Not in a million years!!!
    I just had the best news ever. (Thanks Danny xx)
    I held my breath all day, turned blue a few times, had a pain in my gut with worry but tonight the love of my life really is…. galloping home. I love this horse more than anything ive ever dreamed of. I never knew you had so much space in your heart to love a horse again.
    Yes there is tears pouring down my face writing this, but i'm not ashamed to say it.
    I love my little War horse xx

  • This beautiful border collie through no fault of her own is looking for a new ho…
    This beautiful border collie through no fault of her own is looking for a new home. She is two years old, vaccinated, wormed, neutered and microchipped. But she needs to go to a home with older children and no cats or small dogs. She is very loving and the family that have to let her go are devastated. Please share, thank you.

  • It was so funny today to see large numbers of dogs being walked. They were barki…
    It was so funny today to see large numbers of dogs being walked. They were barking and dancing around.

  • And of course the heart of AHAR… Passion.
    And of course the heart of AHAR… Passion.

  • Catherine told her to give Honky a belly rub. Catherine i'm just wondering were…
    Catherine told her to give Honky a belly rub. Catherine i'm just wondering were you hoping Honky would chase her lol.

  • Pippa….
    Pippa….

  • Catherine warned her to meet and hug her favourite animals. Dinny (the stalker)
    Catherine warned her to meet and hug her favourite animals. Dinny (the stalker)

  • Some of you might remember Catherine O'Leary coming from the UK to help for a we…
    Some of you might remember Catherine O'Leary coming from the UK to help for a week. Well her sister Hannah and father John were on a holiday in Ireland so they decided to call too.

  • Three boys. Andrew, Rory and Keenan worked so hard today. They barely stopped fo…
    Three boys. Andrew, Rory and Keenan worked so hard today. They barely stopped for a lunch break. Every dog at AHAR was walked and played with. You guys just rock xx

  • This beautiful dog went missing from
    Tirnaboul/ Knockeragh Killarney

    Lab cro…

    This beautiful dog went missing from
    Tirnaboul/ Knockeragh Killarney

    Lab cross samoyed husky missing since Aug Bank Holiday Monday. Creamy white colour with long curly husky tail. Microchipped and neutered. Please phone 085-7424200 or 087-6704586. Please share to help get this friendly guy home!

    Thank you

  • Information on how to help a downed horse:
    Harness for Downed Horse (Anderson S…

    Information on how to help a downed horse:
    Harness for Downed Horse (Anderson Sling): http://www.irenedeem.com/downhors.htm
    More on the Anderson Sling: http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/search/news_detail.lasso?id=7832
    ("When Barbaro's condition worsened, they turned to using a novel sling developed at UC Davis called the Anderson sling. This unique lifting device allows a horse to be supported, with the weight taken off the legs, and to sleep standing up. It was developed at UC Davis by John Madigan, an expert in emergency equine veterinary medicine at UC Davis in conjunction with welder Charles Anderson and Rich Morgan. The sling was designed for use to lift weak and injured horses and has found its way into veterinary clinics around the world. The system uses a rectangular metal frame, hoisted above the horse, with a unique support that comfortably lifts the horse by the skeletal system. It is now also commonly used to support horses following surgery or an injury, and to airlift injured horses via helicopter from remote locations.
    "The sling has saved many horses that could not rise on their own or needed to be comfortably supported in the upright position while they recovered from an injury," Madigan said, noting that more than 100 modifications were made to the sling during its eight years of development at UC Davis. "It's gratifying to know that Barbaro is resting comfortably in our sling and can rest his injured leg.")

    http://animalscience.ag.utk.edu/horse/pdf/Care&FeedingoftheStarvedHorseASH155.pdf

    http://www.thehorse.com/articles/22781/safely-increasing-weight-in-emaciated-horses

    http://www.amillionhorses.com/rescue.htm

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10201667609833144&set=pcb.10201667621113426&type=1&theater

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10201645095830308&set=a.2279631471375.2132174.1266434164&type=1&theater

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10201667602272955&set=pcb.10201667621113426&type=1&theater

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10201664554196755&set=a.2279631471375.2132174.1266434164&type=1&theater

    Betsy Rose's contraption for walking: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10201385770747343&set=a.10200818240839450.1073741826.1266434164&type=3&theater
    Another shot of her contraption: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10201274843414229&set=a.10200818240839450.1073741826.1266434164&type=3&theater

    Betsy Rose before: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10201306976937547&set=pb.1266434164.-2207520000.1376416619.&type=3&theater

    Video of Betsy Rose https://www.facebook.com/bhfer.tb?ref=ts&fref=ts

    Solace before: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10201290958337092&set=a.2279631471375.2132174.1266434164&type=3&theater

    Solace after: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10201526106655653&set=pb.1266434164.-2207520000.1376416493.&type=3&theater

    Solace after: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10201290963537222&set=a.2279631471375.2132174.1266434164&type=3&theater

    Solace before and after: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10201025949112027&set=a.2279631471375.2132174.1266434164&type=3&theater

    Solace before: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10200627823239129&set=a.2279631471375.2132174.1266434164&type=3&theater

    Refeeding starved horses
    Recovery from malnutrition, starvation takes time, patience
    Jun 1, 2009
    By: Kenneth L. Marcella, DVM
    DVM360 MAGAZINE

    What happens during starvation?
    A normal horse uses stored fats and carbohydrates for energy, exercise and all normal body functions. These fats and carbohydrates are constantly replenished through adequate dietary intake. Starvation interrupts the replenishment of body stores so the horse initially uses all stored and available fats and carbohydrates. If starvation is halted at this point, a thin horse will generally recover fully, once given access to feed.
    Horses that are chronically starved, however, will begin to use protein when fats and carbohydrates are used up. A starving body cannot select which tissue protein will be metabolized for energy; "consequently, the starved body uses protein, not only from skeletal muscle, but also from vital tissues such as the heart and gastrointestinal tissues," Stull explains.
    As time passes, the horse's condition becomes more precarious. "When it loses more than 50 percent of its body weight, the prognosis for survival is extremely poor," according to Stull.
    Re-feeding starved animals requires that caretakers refrain from killing them with kindness.
    The natural first reaction is to want to give it access to good, rich food and to allow it to "eat itself back to health." But nothing could be worse. Feeding concentrated calories to a starving horse likely will result in "Re-feeding Syndrome" and death in three to five days.
    Such high-caloric feeding causes a rise in insulin, Stull and other nutritionists explain. The insulin peak encourages the storage of carbohydrates into cells for future use, but also causes magnesium, calcium, potassium and phosphorous to be drawn into cells. The intracellular distribution of these electrolytes can have serious consequences because in starved individuals electrolytes have been depleted, so that they barely have enough for normal function.
    When potassium, magnesium and phosphorus become depleted in the general circulation, a cascade of events can occur, leading to kidney failure, respiratory failure, cardiac collapse and death.
    The problems starved horses face are similar to those of performance horses suffering from "exhausted horse syndrome" due to a loss of electrolytes incurred during maximal exercise, usually in hot weather.
    Hypokalemia can result in weak muscles and neurologic dysfunction. Poor heart-muscle function, seizures and coma also can occur. Hypomagnesaemia can produce nervous, irritable or aggressive horses, and hypophosphatemia can result in hemolytic anemia.
    Simple diet recommended
    Because of the importance of reducing insulin elevation while re-feeding and because of the extreme sensitivity of starved horses to concentrations of potassium, magnesium and phosphorus, the best diet to use is surprisingly one of the simplest.
    "The best approach to re-feeding a starved horse is to give frequent (every 4 hours) meals of high-quality alfalfa hay," Stull says.
    One pound or about one-sixth of a flake at each meal will provide a good source of protein to begin rebuilding the body. Because alfalfa is high in calcium, magnesium and phosphorus, it helps provide electrolytes that reduce the risk for catastrophic system failure.
    This diet should be maintained for 10 days, though the amount of alfalfa can be increased (up to four pounds) and the number of feedings decreased (to three) for Days 4 through 10.
    After 10 days the horse can be fed as much alfalfa as it will eat in two feedings, and it should be allowed access to a salt or electrolyte mix. Feeding grain or other supplements should be avoided until the horse is well on its way to recovery, which can take 60 to 90 days.
    Full return to normal body weight may require three to five months. Caretakers are urged to be patient and to go slowly because overly aggressive feeding and the introduction of calories too early will worsen the prognosis for recovery.
    Poor prognosis
    Even with the best of situations and attention to proper diet, the odds often are not in favor of severely starved horses. Researchers in the Veterinary Services and Animal Industry branches of the Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Initiatives report that "about 20 percent of severely malnourished horses can be expected to die in spite of attempts at re-feeding."
    In an article titled, "Chronically starved horses: predicting survival, economic and ethical considerations," these researchers looked at the case of 45 chronically starved horses that were impounded under the Manitoba Animal Care Act, evaluated and rehabilitated and then sold at auction.
    Detailed records of the cost of this action included transport, carcass disposal and use of a dedicated rehabilitation paddock, feeding, medication and antiparasite medication.
    Costs were not even closely covered by the eventual sale of the surviving horses, the researchers say. While sensitive to the differing value placed on horses as opposed to other large-animal species, the researchers debate the ethics of managing severely starved and at-risk horses. They question whether early euthanasia may be a more reasonable option for some starved horses, given the difficulty in rehabilitation, time required and the cost to rescue organizations.
    "Future policy direction," they write, may require a balance between fiscally responsible management of welfare cases and what is considered acceptable to the public at large."
    Prevention of starvation cases is the best solution, and education is the key to prevention.
    Veterinarians are encouraged to accept their role in owner education, providing nutritional and management consultation when possible. When faced with re-feeding a starved horse, veterinarians are reminded to take a long-term approach and be aware of the specific requirements and needs of these unique animals.
    Marcella is an equine practitioner in Canton, Ga.


    DownHorse
    www.irenedeem.com
    Dr. Madigan explained that horse owners should contact their vet immediately upon noticing a horse down. As prey animals it is against their nature to lie down for prolonged periods. The only reason a horse will remain down is grave illness or injury. It is ALWAYS serious and the owner should not de…

  • This gorgeous collie x puppy was found this morning in Knockrear park in Killarn…
    This gorgeous collie x puppy was found this morning in Knockrear park in Killarney at about 8.30. Does anybody know it. Please share and see if we can find its owner and let's hope it wasn't dumped.

  • We are delighted to announce a raffle for 4 VIP Guest List Passes to A Woman's H…
    We are delighted to announce a raffle for 4 VIP Guest List Passes to A Woman's Heart in the Olympia, Dublin, featuring Eleanor McEvoy, Mary Coughlan, Sharon Shannon, Gemma Hayes and Hermionie Hennessy!

    The winner can choose one of these dates – 28th, 29th 30th or 31st August.

    The raffle tickets are just €10 each. You can get one ticket or multiple tickets, it’s up to you. We will make the draw next Tuesday, Aug. 20th.

    Get your raffle tickets here… http://on.ahar.ie/womansheart

    All your donations will go directly towards the purchase of our permanent premises – our very own AHAR forever home

  • These three kittens are up for adoption. They are 8 weeks old and as you can see…
    These three kittens are up for adoption. They are 8 weeks old and as you can see adorable. If you are interested please pm us and we can pass on the owned number. They are not at AHAR they are in Causeway. And can you please share.

  • A photo of 2 avid AHAR fans, Davin Godfrey and his uncle Patrick Godfrey.
    Big th…

    A photo of 2 avid AHAR fans, Davin Godfrey and his uncle Patrick Godfrey.
    Big thank you to you both for showing up to support AHAR's recent Dog Show despite the dreadful weather…

  • Sponsor A Stable for Dottie Pottie

    Just 12 of the 50 “Stable shares” at a don…

    Sponsor A Stable for Dottie Pottie

    Just 12 of the 50 “Stable shares” at a donation of €20 each are now left in the 'Dottie Pottie Stable Syndicate' – just log on to http://on.ahar.ie/dottiepottiesyn

    You can take one "share" or multiple “shares”, it’s up to you. We will keep you up to date on progress and list all the donors when the Syndicate is full. Just €240 more needed!

    Dottie Pottie was left in a box outside AHAR’s gate as a 6 week old puppy two years ago. He was soaked wet from sweat as the box was lined with plastic. He was covered in lice and eaten by worms. How this beautiful baby survived, we'll never know. We think he lived on pure love alone because Suzanne used to mind him like a baby, carrying him around in a knitted hat hung around her neck 24/7.

    Over time, the vet removed a pint of fluid from his tiny head. He had encephalitis. As a result he is a special needs dog. Sometimes we think he should get him his own guide dog – he walks into walls, he falls over and he barks at his reflection in puddles. But far more importantly he is AHAR’s resident meeter and greeter – everyone who visits AHAR gets hugs/kisses and covered in paw prints from Dottie.

    If every human was as kind, happy and welcoming as Dottie Pottie, the world be a better place. And that is why we'd love for his name to be forever commemorated at the new AHAR premises with his very own Sponsored Stable – to pay tribute to a very special 'special needs' dog who overcame all the odds to survive and who greets every visitor to AHAR with the same warm, loving welcome that we aim to show to every animal which we rescue and bring into our care.

    Dottie's heart is full of love and happiness, despite all that he has suffered, and he is a shining example to us all (even if he does occasionally take toy ducks hostage!!).

    As many of you are aware, we are currently fund-raising to buy a permanent future home for AHAR. Our new Rescue Centre is a former Equestrian Centre with 30 acres of land including a Stable Block, arena and outbuildings. As part of our fund-raising, we have made the 28 existing stables available for sponsorship. (Life-time sponsorship with a plaque on the door for a once-off donation of €1,000). 25 of the stables have been sponsored and 3 are still available – including this one for Dottie Pottie.

    Thanks as always for your support and a big hug, kiss and mucky paw print from Dottie to all those who have donated!

  • Thanks to May Crawford for creating this fab poster of the fund-raising gig for…
    Thanks to May Crawford for creating this fab poster of the fund-raising gig for AHAR that the legendary Mick Hanly (supported by the wonderful Honor Heffernan) is doing this Friday August 16th (9pm) at O'Riadas Bar, near Castleisland.

    This is an amazing opportunity to catch Mick and Honor in action, to appreciate their incredible talent and to enjoy a great night out Your support will also help AHAR to save a lot more animals as every cent made on the night will go to AHAR – tickets from O'Riadas Bar or phone 0667137761.

    Please share this post & we look forward to seeing you there



What’s Happening: August 13, 2013 What’s Happening: August 17, 2013
What’s Happening: August 13, 2013
What’s Happening: August 17, 2013